Marquee Digital

Special Thanks

Sponsors and Grantors

Opera Roanoke would like to thank the following sponsors and grantors for their support of the 2021-2022 Season.

Grantors

No items found.

Corporate Sponsors

No items found.

Media Partners

No items found.

Donors

Opera Roanoake would like to thank our Donors for their generous gifts. 

No items found.

Tributes

Opera Roanoake is honored to acknowledge gifts made in tribute or memory of special friends.

No items found.

Cast
(in alphabetical order)

Kyle Albertson

*

Bass-Baritone

Jennifer Johnson Cano

*

Mezzo-Soprano

Setting

Songs

Opera Roanoke Staff

  • General Director
  • Brooke Tolley
  • Artistic Director
  • Steven White
  • Development Coordinator
  • Bruce Loving
  • Community Engagement Associate
  • Ansley Melton

Board of Trustees

President

Daniel C. Summerlin III

Vice President

Artistic Director

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Vice-President

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Vice-President

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Managing Director

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Secretary

Paula Prince

Treasurer

Robert Nordt Sr.

Immediate Past President

William "Bill" Krause

Director of Marketing

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Box Office

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Ushers

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Suspendisse varius enim in eros elementum tristique. Duis cursus, mi quis viverra ornare, eros dolor interdum nulla, ut commodo diam libero vitae erat. Aenean faucibus nibh et justo cursus id rutrum lorem imperdiet. Nunc ut sem vitae risus tristique posuere.

Board Members

  • Sally Adams
  • Barbara von Claparede-Crola
  • Rupert "Rupe" Cutler
  • Isabel Ditzel
  • James "Jim" Kern
  • Krista Vannoy

Board Members

  • Sally Adams
  • Barbara von Claparede-Crola
  • Rupert "Rupe" Cutler
  • Isabel Ditzel
  • James "Jim" Kern
  • Krista Vannoy

21-22 Season Welcome Letter

Dear Friends of Opera Roanoke,

Welcome to Opera Roanoke’s 46th Season of live performances in the Roanoke Valley. If this past year has taught us anything, it is how vital this art form and its patrons are to our community. We have missed you terribly, but we are ready to welcome you back to the theatre with a line-up of programs that highlight the best of all this art form has to offer – from traditional to contemporary – performances that will expand your mind and fulfill your soul.

At the core of everything we do at Opera Roanoke, is the belief in the power of the human voice to entertain, teach, and connect. With each of our three mainstage offerings this season, there is an opportunity to witness our mission in action.  We invite you to explore a world where the ordinary becomes extraordinary through the power of music and singing.

We are excited to share our 2021-22 season with you and we look forward to seeing you {back} at the Opera!

Sincerely,

  • Brooke Tolley
    General Director
  • Steven White
    Artistic Director
  • Daniel C. Summerlin, III
    President, Board of Trustees

Program Notes

Bluebeard’s Castle

American premiere of Eberhard Kloke’s version for chamber orchestra

Béla Bartók (1881–1945) was a Hungarian composer and an important pioneer in the field of ethnomusicology. During the first decades of his life, he was better known for his work in collecting and analyzing folk music than for his own compositions. He fled fascism to settle in New York City in 1940. At the time of his death from leukemia, his stature as a composer was beginning to grow internationally.

Bartók’s only opera is an intense psychological journey, a powerful drama of inner emotion, and a tour de force for its two singers and orchestra. Loosely based on Charles Perrault’s late–17th-century fairy tale, it tells the grotesque story of a rich and powerful man, suspected of having murdered several wives, who brings a new bride to his castle. In Bartók’s version, the bride, Judith, prods Bluebeard to open seven doors, each of which reveals an aspect of Bluebeard’s life, material possessions, and, by extension, his soul. With the opening of the final door, Judith is engulfed in his dark subconscious.

By the time the opera was written, the Perrault tale had become a metaphor for contemporary psychological questions: How well can two people know each other? How much should they attempt to find out? While such an approach, almost completely without conventional “action,” could easily have resulted in an overly didactic treatment, Bartók’s music makes the opera a thrilling journey. The score resides on, yet not quite beyond, the jagged edges of tonality. Like the subconscious and the dream world it depicts, it sounds familiar enough so as not to be experienced as abstract, yet foreign and disturbing enough to create a feeling of unease. It is a unique achievement in opera and a great challenge to the performers and production team.

Musicologists delight in analyzing the score of Bluebeard’s Castle, but the opera is remarkable for its ability to make a direct and powerful impression on anyone. The music is closely linked to the rhythms of the text, and yet gives it an acoustic power that transcends the strictly syntactic meaning. It speaks to the emotions as well as to the intellect.

The opera opens with a spoken prologue, in which the audience is invited to question whether what they’re about to see is really happening or takes place in their imagination. Bartók builds each of the scenes, represented by each of the seven doors of Bluebeard’s castle, around its own pitch center: beginning in F-sharp, moving to a bright C (expressed in a glorious outpouring of melody) in the fifth scene, and returning to the subdued F-sharp at the end. The whole drama is contained within this sequence: loneliness with a glimpse of the lost opportunity for love and light.

Much of the title character’s vocal line is declamatory and indeed without much color or range. Its power lies in its dramatic delivery. Conversely, Judith’s music covers a wider range. The underlying intention is clear: She is attempting to break away from his stifling presence. The music of Bluebeard’s Castle makes a universal tale of human relationships from a symbolist psychological study.

Bartók began the project, his sole opera, in 1911, working from a libretto by Béla Balázs. Adapting a particular violent story from Perrault’s collection—now often omitted from modern editions—Balázs, a leading intellectual in Budapest circles, had created a new, psychological rendering of the tale. He removed the happy conclusion, in which Judith is saved from the castle by her brothers and, employing Hungarian folk idiom, turned his focus to the strange relationship between Judith and her husband. “My ballad is the ballad of the inner life,” the poet explained. “Bluebeard’s castle is not a real castle of stone. The castle is his soul. It is lonely, dark and secretive: the castle of closed doors.”

In his score, Bartók likewise presented an inner life, not only pumping musical blood into the veins of the two characters but also presenting a précis of his maturation as a composer. His musical education had begun through his parents’ performances at home, as well as by his own exploration of works by Brahms and Schumann. But in travelling from what is now the borderland between Hungary and Romania to the former’s newly established capital of Budapest, Bartók discovered much richer musical landscapes. Attending the city’s Academy, he not only encountered the music of Richard Strauss but also that of Debussy, thanks to his meeting with the man who was to be his colleague and companion, Zoltán Kodály, in 1905. Such diverse musical seams fused in the works that Bartók began both to create and to notate. He had announced in 1904 that he would “collect the finest Hungarian folk- songs and elevate them, adding the best possible piano accompaniments, to the level of art song.” His encounter with Kodály made that ambition a reality. Working in collaboration, they were prolific in their collecting activities and the music they discovered came to infuse their work.

But what is so remarkable about Bartók’s output is not its ability to reflect diverse influences but to sublimate the strands into one, as is clear in Bluebeard’s Castle.  Progress with the score was slow. With it, Bartók had hoped to win the Ferenc Erkel Prize in 1911, but he failed both in this and in a 1912 competition run by music publishers Rózsavölgyi, with one judge deeming the work impossible to stage and another thinking it far too dark. Bartók was devastated, but when, after World War I, the opera was finally mounted in Budapest, he experienced at least a partial refutation of those judgements.

As musical drama, Bartók’s only opera offers a decidedly bleak resolution to the oppositions at its core: Judith vs. Bluebeard, light vs. dark, sanity vs. madness, tonality vs. atonality. These tensions are immediately apparent as the ambiguous spoken prologue trails into silence and the score begins, low down in the orchestra’s register. Its music revolves around a penumbrous F-sharp chord, spelled out in folksy, pentatonic terms. Quickly, the woodwinds cut across this dark but sonorous sound, centering instead on a triad of C major. The clash between these elements spells out the interval of a tritone, the middle point in the chromatic scale or, rather, the polar opposite of the very first note we heard.

Such a dichotomy is seemingly resolved at the blinding opening of the fifth of the seven doors in Bluebeard’s castle. Accompanied by full orchestra (including an organ), Judith screams in amazement at the vastness of the kingdom she can see beyond, the music resounding with the luminescence of C major. But as with every door that she unlocks, there follows a shudder, a strange, angular scale, couched in the same sound-world as the clashing semitone that represents the blood covering everything in sight.

Once more, Bluebeard coolly thanks Judith for bringing daylight into the castle, but when, inevitably, she unlocks the last door of his soul, following her forebears into that final room, the music returns to Bluebeard’s dark, modal sound-world. All light is extinguished, and we are taken back to the primordial “Once upon a time” that is, thanks to Bartók’s psychologically acute music, the clarion call of eternity.

— Gavin Plumley

Gavin Plumley, commissioning editor of English-language program notes for the Salzburg Festival, specializes in the music and culture of Central Europe. He appears frequently on the BBC and has written for publications around the world.

Cast
Creatives

Meet the Cast

No items found.

Kyle Albertson

*

(
Bass-Baritone
)

Mr. Albertson made his European début at Opera Köln in Germany as Frank Murrant in Street Scene and will return to Europe in 2022 to perform the title role in Der fliegende Holländer and Wotan in Loriot’s Der Ring an einem Abend for Opera Graz.  In addition, he will return to the Metropolitan as Angelotti in Tosca.

He first joined The Metropolitan Opera roster for Don Giovanni and returned for five consecutive seasons in their productions of Le nozze di Figaro, Die Zauberflöte, Dialogues des carmélites, The Merry Widow, and Manon. 2020 and 2021 Metropolitan Opera engagements were to include covering the roles of the Dutchman in Der fliegende Holländer, Claggart in Billy Budd, and Kurwenal in Tristan und Isolde. He recently stepped back onto the stage as Scarpia in Tosca for the Phoenicia Festival and performed Wotan in Das Rheingold for Opera Santa Barbara and Virginia Opera.

Jennifer Johnson Cano

*

(
Mezzo-Soprano
)

A naturally gifted singer noted for her commanding stage presence and profound artistry, Jennifer Johnson Cano has garnered critical acclaim for committed performances of both new and standard repertoire. For her performance as Offred in Poul Ruders’s The Handmaid’s Tale she was lauded as “towering…restless, powerful, profound, she is as formidable as this astonishingly demanding role deserves” (New York Times). With more than 100 performances on the stage at The Metropolitan Opera, her most recent roles have included Nicklausse, Emilia, Hansel and Meg Page.

Highlights this season include the premiere of Kevin Puts’s The Hours with the Philadelphia Orchestra, Beethoven 9 with the Chicago and San Francisco Symphonies, and the New York premiere of Marc Neikrug’s A Song By Mahler at CMS Lincoln Center. She performs Poulenc’s Dialogues of the Carmelites (Mother Marie) with Houston Grand Opera; the world premiere of Gregory Spear’s Castor and Patience (Celeste) with Cincinnati Opera; and Bartok’s Bluebeard’s Castle (Judith) with Roanoke Opera.

Creative Team

Steven White

*

Conductor, Stage Director & Scenic Designer

Praised by Opera News as a conductor who “squeezes every drop of excitement and pathos from the score,” Steven White is one of North America’s premiere operatic and symphonic conductors. He made his acclaimed Metropolitan Opera debut in 2010, conducting performances of La traviata starring Angela Gheorghiu. Since then he has conducted a number of Metropolitan Opera performances of La traviata, with such stars as Natalie Dessay, Hei-Kyung Hong, Plácido Domingo, Thomas Hampson, Dmitri Hvorostovksy and Matthew Polenzani. In the past several seasons he has returned to the Met to participate in critically fêted productions of Don Carlo, Billy Budd, The Rake’s Progress and Elektra.

With a vibrant repertoire of over sixty-five titles, Maestro White’s extensive operatic engagements have included performances with New York City Opera, L’Opera de Montréal, Vancouver Opera, Opera Colorado, Pittsburgh Opera, Michigan Opera Theater, Baltimore Opera, New Orleans Opera, and many others. In recent seasons he has conducted Rigoletto with San Diego Opera, Otello and La traviata with Austin Opera, La traviata with Utah Opera, and a world premiere staged production of a brand-new Bärenreiter edition of Gounod’s Faust with Opera Omaha. In the 2021-2022 season, he returns to the Metropolitan Opera for their production of Tosca, which he also conducts for Utah Opera. He continues his close collaboration with Opera Omaha, conducting Eugene Onegin, joins Peabody Opera Theatre as guest conductor for Dominick Argento’s Postcard from Morocco, and returns to Opera Roanoke for Bluebeard’s Castle in the fall and Verdi’s Requiem in the spring.

In 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the cancellation of his eleventh production at Arizona Opera, Ariadne auf Naxos, as well as the company premiere of André Previn’s A Streetcar Named Desire at Opera Roanoke. Other projects in the 2020-21 season COVID-impacted season included a reimagined Rigoletto with Tulsa Opera at Tulsa’s ONEOK Field (performed), and Le nozze di Figaro in a return to Opera Omaha (postponed).

Music critics are effusive in their praise of conductor Steven White’s ability to elicit inspired music-making from orchestras. Of his 2016 performances with the Omaha Symphony, the Omaha World-Herald asserts that, “it would be hard to imagine a more complete performance of the Symphonie Fantastique. Highly nuanced, tightly controlled and crisp, Steven White asked everything from orchestra members and they were flawless. He led them out of serene beauty into disturbing dissonance and even to the terrifying point of musical madness without ever losing control. It was insanely good.” Opera News declares, “White is amazing: he consistently demands and gets the absolute best playing from the orchestra.”

Among the many orchestras Maestro White has conducted are the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Moscow Philharmonic, the Orchestre Métropolitain du Grand Montréal, the Mozarteum und Salzburg Kulturvereinigung Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the New World Symphony Orchestra, the Spoleto Festival Orchestra, the Colorado Symphony, the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, the Charleston Symphony, the Florida Philharmonic, the Fort Worth Symphony and London’s Philharmonia Orchestra for a CHANDOS recording of arias featuring his wife, soprano Elizabeth Futral. In 2019 he made debuts with the San Diego Symphony, the Utah Symphony Orchestra and the Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra.

Maestro White is a passionate and dedicated educator. He has served multiple artistic residencies and led productions at such institutions as the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Indiana University, the College Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati, the University of Miami Frost School of Music Program in Salzburg, Kennesaw State University and Virginia Tech University. In the summer of 2019 he served as an artist in residence at the Shanghai Conservatory in China and in 2020 he led a critically acclaimed production of La clemenza di Tito for the North Carolina School of the Arts Fletcher Opera Institute. He is in constant demand as an adjudicator of the most prestigious music and vocal competitions, including numerous auditions for the Metropolitan Opera National Council and the Jensen Foundation.

Steven White proudly makes his home in Virginia, where he serves as Artistic Director of Opera Roanoke, a company with which he has been associated for two decades. Maestro White has conducted dozens of productions in Roanoke, including performances of Das Lied von der Erde, Der fliegende Holländer, Fidelio, Falstaff, Otello, Macbeth, Aida, Hänsel und Gretel and many others. In recognition of his contributions to the civic, cultural and artistic life of Southwest Virginia, Roanoke College conferred on Maestro White an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts in May 2013.

Steven White

*

Conductor, Stage Director & Scenic Designer

Praised by Opera News as a conductor who “squeezes every drop of excitement and pathos from the score,” Steven White is one of North America’s premiere operatic and symphonic conductors. He made his acclaimed Metropolitan Opera debut in 2010, conducting performances of La traviata starring Angela Gheorghiu. Since then he has conducted a number of Metropolitan Opera performances of La traviata, with such stars as Natalie Dessay, Hei-Kyung Hong, Plácido Domingo, Thomas Hampson, Dmitri Hvorostovksy and Matthew Polenzani. In the past several seasons he has returned to the Met to participate in critically fêted productions of Don Carlo, Billy Budd, The Rake’s Progress and Elektra.

With a vibrant repertoire of over sixty-five titles, Maestro White’s extensive operatic engagements have included performances with New York City Opera, L’Opera de Montréal, Vancouver Opera, Opera Colorado, Pittsburgh Opera, Michigan Opera Theater, Baltimore Opera, New Orleans Opera, and many others. In recent seasons he has conducted Rigoletto with San Diego Opera, Otello and La traviata with Austin Opera, La traviata with Utah Opera, and a world premiere staged production of a brand-new Bärenreiter edition of Gounod’s Faust with Opera Omaha. In the 2021-2022 season, he returns to the Metropolitan Opera for their production of Tosca, which he also conducts for Utah Opera. He continues his close collaboration with Opera Omaha, conducting Eugene Onegin, joins Peabody Opera Theatre as guest conductor for Dominick Argento’s Postcard from Morocco, and returns to Opera Roanoke for Bluebeard’s Castle in the fall and Verdi’s Requiem in the spring.

In 2020 the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the cancellation of his eleventh production at Arizona Opera, Ariadne auf Naxos, as well as the company premiere of André Previn’s A Streetcar Named Desire at Opera Roanoke. Other projects in the 2020-21 season COVID-impacted season included a reimagined Rigoletto with Tulsa Opera at Tulsa’s ONEOK Field (performed), and Le nozze di Figaro in a return to Opera Omaha (postponed).

Music critics are effusive in their praise of conductor Steven White’s ability to elicit inspired music-making from orchestras. Of his 2016 performances with the Omaha Symphony, the Omaha World-Herald asserts that, “it would be hard to imagine a more complete performance of the Symphonie Fantastique. Highly nuanced, tightly controlled and crisp, Steven White asked everything from orchestra members and they were flawless. He led them out of serene beauty into disturbing dissonance and even to the terrifying point of musical madness without ever losing control. It was insanely good.” Opera News declares, “White is amazing: he consistently demands and gets the absolute best playing from the orchestra.”

Among the many orchestras Maestro White has conducted are the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, the Moscow Philharmonic, the Orchestre Métropolitain du Grand Montréal, the Mozarteum und Salzburg Kulturvereinigung Orchestra, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, the New World Symphony Orchestra, the Spoleto Festival Orchestra, the Colorado Symphony, the Nashville Symphony Orchestra, the Columbus Symphony Orchestra, the Charleston Symphony, the Florida Philharmonic, the Fort Worth Symphony and London’s Philharmonia Orchestra for a CHANDOS recording of arias featuring his wife, soprano Elizabeth Futral. In 2019 he made debuts with the San Diego Symphony, the Utah Symphony Orchestra and the Williamsburg Symphony Orchestra.

Maestro White is a passionate and dedicated educator. He has served multiple artistic residencies and led productions at such institutions as the Peabody Conservatory of Music, Indiana University, the College Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati, the University of Miami Frost School of Music Program in Salzburg, Kennesaw State University and Virginia Tech University. In the summer of 2019 he served as an artist in residence at the Shanghai Conservatory in China and in 2020 he led a critically acclaimed production of La clemenza di Tito for the North Carolina School of the Arts Fletcher Opera Institute. He is in constant demand as an adjudicator of the most prestigious music and vocal competitions, including numerous auditions for the Metropolitan Opera National Council and the Jensen Foundation.

Steven White proudly makes his home in Virginia, where he serves as Artistic Director of Opera Roanoke, a company with which he has been associated for two decades. Maestro White has conducted dozens of productions in Roanoke, including performances of Das Lied von der Erde, Der fliegende Holländer, Fidelio, Falstaff, Otello, Macbeth, Aida, Hänsel und Gretel and many others. In recognition of his contributions to the civic, cultural and artistic life of Southwest Virginia, Roanoke College conferred on Maestro White an Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts in May 2013.

Tláloc López-Watermann

*

Lighting Designer & Assistant Stage Director

Tláloc López-Watermann is the founder of Light Conversations, LLC, a lighting and video design company based in New York City. Tlaloc regularly collaborates with stage directors Crystal Manich, Copeland Woodruff, Dean Anthony, JJ Hudson, and James Marvel. He has also designed for directors Ned Canty, Timothy Nelson, Tomer Zvulun, Andrew Eggert, Beth Greenberg, Corinne Hayes, and Sarah Meyers.

Tlaloc is fluent in Spanish and German and spent a season working at the Deutsche Oper Berlin. Tlaloc has also worked regularly for The Seattle Opera, North Carolina Opera, Opera Louisiane, Toledo Opera, Utah Festival Opera, Todi Music Festival, Opera Roanoke, Opera Naples, and Shreveport Opera. In 2013, Tlaloc was chosen as the festival lighting designer for Lorin Maazel’s prestigious Castleton Festival in Virginia and has been lighting designer in residence for the Janiec Opera Company in Brevard, North Carolina.

In 2016, Tlaloc made company debuts with Amarillo Opera (Le Nozze di Figaro); Opera Grand Rapids (Gluck's Orphee); and Pittsburgh Opera (Ricardo Primo). In 2017, Tlaloc made debuts with Lawrence University (Hydrogen Jukebox), Opera Columbus, and Opera on the James. In addition to his work in opera, Tlaloc has worked with the Ontological Hysterical Company in New York City, In Strange Company in Albuquerque, A Host of People in Detroit, and The Arena Stage in Washington, DC, where he was the Allen Lee Hughes Lighting Fellow. He holds a BFA in Performance Production from Cornish College of the Arts, and an MFA in Design from NYU / Tisch.

Tláloc López-Watermann

*

Lighting Designer & Assistant Stage Director

Tláloc López-Watermann is the founder of Light Conversations, LLC, a lighting and video design company based in New York City. Tlaloc regularly collaborates with stage directors Crystal Manich, Copeland Woodruff, Dean Anthony, JJ Hudson, and James Marvel. He has also designed for directors Ned Canty, Timothy Nelson, Tomer Zvulun, Andrew Eggert, Beth Greenberg, Corinne Hayes, and Sarah Meyers.

Tlaloc is fluent in Spanish and German and spent a season working at the Deutsche Oper Berlin. Tlaloc has also worked regularly for The Seattle Opera, North Carolina Opera, Opera Louisiane, Toledo Opera, Utah Festival Opera, Todi Music Festival, Opera Roanoke, Opera Naples, and Shreveport Opera. In 2013, Tlaloc was chosen as the festival lighting designer for Lorin Maazel’s prestigious Castleton Festival in Virginia and has been lighting designer in residence for the Janiec Opera Company in Brevard, North Carolina.

In 2016, Tlaloc made company debuts with Amarillo Opera (Le Nozze di Figaro); Opera Grand Rapids (Gluck's Orphee); and Pittsburgh Opera (Ricardo Primo). In 2017, Tlaloc made debuts with Lawrence University (Hydrogen Jukebox), Opera Columbus, and Opera on the James. In addition to his work in opera, Tlaloc has worked with the Ontological Hysterical Company in New York City, In Strange Company in Albuquerque, A Host of People in Detroit, and The Arena Stage in Washington, DC, where he was the Allen Lee Hughes Lighting Fellow. He holds a BFA in Performance Production from Cornish College of the Arts, and an MFA in Design from NYU / Tisch.

Joey Neighbors

*

Set Builder & Technical Director

Joey has been in the theatre all his life. He has worked on countless productions all over the Southeast and Northeast United States. He has his BFA from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. He has been the resident builder for Opera Roanoke for the past six seasons. He has worked with Opera Roanoke on countless productions on and off since 1986. Along with his work with Opera Roanoke he also works with Roanoke Ballet Theatre, Southwest Virginia Ballet, Roanoke Children’s Theatre, Off the Rails Theatre in Roanoke, Opera on the James in Lynchburg, and Annapolis Opera in AnnapolisMD. He has owned his own business for 18 years, Neighbors Handyman & Custom Carpentry and Star City Sets, doing small remodeling/repair jobs, tile work, and custom built-in’s and Sets for Opera and Theatre Companies. His joy in life is his family.

Joey Neighbors

*

Set Builder & Technical Director

Joey has been in the theatre all his life. He has worked on countless productions all over the Southeast and Northeast United States. He has his BFA from the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. He has been the resident builder for Opera Roanoke for the past six seasons. He has worked with Opera Roanoke on countless productions on and off since 1986. Along with his work with Opera Roanoke he also works with Roanoke Ballet Theatre, Southwest Virginia Ballet, Roanoke Children’s Theatre, Off the Rails Theatre in Roanoke, Opera on the James in Lynchburg, and Annapolis Opera in AnnapolisMD. He has owned his own business for 18 years, Neighbors Handyman & Custom Carpentry and Star City Sets, doing small remodeling/repair jobs, tile work, and custom built-in’s and Sets for Opera and Theatre Companies. His joy in life is his family.

John Lipe

*

Stage Manager

John Lipe, Stage Manager, is a native of Carbondale, Illinois. He has worked for opera companies across the country, such as the Opera Company of Philadelphia, New Orleans Opera, Opera Columbus, Boston Early Music Festival, Opera Memphis, Opera Roanoke, Opera Southwest, Tampa Opera, Fargo-Moorhead Opera, Toledo Opera, Opera Nevada, and Utah Festival Opera.

John Lipe

*

Stage Manager

John Lipe, Stage Manager, is a native of Carbondale, Illinois. He has worked for opera companies across the country, such as the Opera Company of Philadelphia, New Orleans Opera, Opera Columbus, Boston Early Music Festival, Opera Memphis, Opera Roanoke, Opera Southwest, Tampa Opera, Fargo-Moorhead Opera, Toledo Opera, Opera Nevada, and Utah Festival Opera.

Marquee Digital

*

Digital Program

Marquee Digital is a New York-based tech startup innovating the theatre industry with ground-breaking digital program solutions. The Marquee is a theatrical program for the 21st century, employing contactless, eco-friendly, and ADA-compliant technology to create an interactive and highly intuitive experience for audience members. With a client roster that spans both coasts of the Continental U.S., Marquee Digital aims to enter the West End market in Spring of 2022.

Marquee Digital

*

Digital Program

Marquee Digital is a New York-based tech startup innovating the theatre industry with ground-breaking digital program solutions. The Marquee is a theatrical program for the 21st century, employing contactless, eco-friendly, and ADA-compliant technology to create an interactive and highly intuitive experience for audience members. With a client roster that spans both coasts of the Continental U.S., Marquee Digital aims to enter the West End market in Spring of 2022.

Production staff

Amici Musicorum

Violin I
  • Akemi Takayama, Concertmaster
  • M. Alan Pearce
  • Andrew Emmett
  • Wendy Rawls
  • Christi Salisbury

Violin II
  • Matvey Lapin, Principal
  • Shaleen Powell
  • Vladimir Kromin
  • Donna Stewart

Viola
  • Bernard DiGregorio, Principal
  • Thomas Stevens, Assistant Principal
  • Stanley Beckwith

Cello
  • Kelley Mikkelsen, Principal
  • Rachel Sexton
  • Sarah Kapps

Bass
  • T. Alan Stewart, Principal
  • John P Smith, IV, Associate Principal

Flute/Piccolo
  • Alycia Hugo, Principal

Flute, Alto Flute, Piccolo
  • Julee Hickcox

Oboe
  • William P Parrish, Principal

Oboe/English Horn
  • Stephen Key

Clarinet
  • Carmen Eby, Principal
  • Roddy Terrell

Bass Clarinet
  • Kathleen Mulcahy

Bassoon
  • Scott Bartlett, Principal
  • Ryan Romine

Contra Basson
  • Ryan Romine

Horns
  • Abigail Pack
  • Dakota Corbliss

Trumpet
  • Paul M. Neebe, Principal

Trombone
  • Jay Crone, Principal

Percussion
  • Zubin Hathi
  • Cameron Leach

Timpani
  • Annie Stevens

Harp
  • Helen Rifas

Keyboard
  • Erica Sipes
Violin I
  • Akemi Takayama, Concertmaster
  • M. Alan Pearce
  • Andrew Emmett
  • Wendy Rawls
  • Christi Salisbury

Violin II
  • Matvey Lapin, Principal
  • Shaleen Powell
  • Vladimir Kromin
  • Donna Stewart

Viola
  • Bernard DiGregorio, Principal
  • Thomas Stevens, Assistant Principal
  • Stanley Beckwith

Cello
  • Kelley Mikkelsen, Principal
  • Rachel Sexton
  • Sarah Kapps

Bass
  • T. Alan Stewart, Principal
  • John P Smith, IV, Associate Principal

Flute/Piccolo
  • Alycia Hugo, Principal

Flute, Alto Flute, Piccolo
  • Julee Hickcox

Oboe
  • William P Parrish, Principal

Oboe/English Horn
  • Stephen Key

Clarinet
  • Carmen Eby, Principal
  • Roddy Terrell

Bass Clarinet
  • Kathleen Mulcahy

Bassoon
  • Scott Bartlett, Principal
  • Ryan Romine

Contra Basson
  • Ryan Romine

Horns
  • Abigail Pack
  • Dakota Corbliss

Trumpet
  • Paul M. Neebe, Principal

Trombone
  • Jay Crone, Principal

Percussion
  • Zubin Hathi
  • Cameron Leach

Timpani
  • Annie Stevens

Harp
  • Helen Rifas

Keyboard
  • Erica Sipes
Media
Connect
No items found.

Let's Connect

Theatre is all about connection. Follow us to keep in touch and stay up to date on all the latest news!

At This Performance